• International Webinar on Pesticides Poisonings in India demands Syngenta to acknowledge liability of its product Polo

    International Webinar on Pesticides Poisonings in India demands Syngenta to acknowledge liability of its product Polo PAN India, PAN AP, Public Eye and ECCHR | 26th June 2021 Press Note An international webinar titled ‘Pesticides Poisonings in India : implications for business accountability and regulatory reform’ was organised yesterday 24thJune, 2021. The webinar discussed the quest for justice and accountability of a group of Indian farmers who were poisoned by a pesticide marketed by the Swiss agrochemical giant, Syngenta, and shed light on the way forward for regulating pesticides use both in India and Europe. The webinar was jointly organised by the Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisoned Persons (MAPPP), the Pesticides Action Network (PAN India) and PAN Asia Pacific together with Public Eye and the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR).  The webinar discussed various aspects of the unfortunate incidents of occupational poisonings of farmers and farm workers in Yavatmal district in Maharashtra India.   Background In 2017, hundreds of small-scale farmers and farm workers were poisoned – and over 20 died – in just a few weeks whilst spraying pesticides on cotton fields in the district of Yavatmal. A key product involved was the insecticide Polo, manufactured by Syngenta. The use of Polo’s active ingredient diafenthiuron is long banned in Switzerland and the European Union but Syngenta keeps selling it in countries where regulations are weaker and less strictly enforced. In 2017, Syngenta exported 75 tonnes of diafenthiuron from Switzerland to India. A Special Investigation Team (SIT) investigated the poisoning in Yavatmal, identified several policy measures and recommended to ban multiple product formulations that were responsible for most of the deaths, including diafenthiuron. Although temporary bans were adopted, today all products are again available on the Indian market. In September 2020, Public Eye, ECCHR, PAN India and MAPPP filed a “specific instance” with the Swiss national contact point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, on behalf of a group of 51 affected farmers, to demand that Syngenta provides remedy and changes its sales practices in India. At the same time, a claim for compensation was filed in the court of Basel, by the law firm Schadensanwälte on behalf of the families of two victims who died and a farmer who was severely injured due to the exposure to the pesticide Polo. In October 2020, Switzerland decided to prohibit the export of five highly hazardous pesticides including diafenthiuron. Just a few weeks later, the Responsible Business initiative, which proposed to introduce mandatory human rights due diligence requirements for Swiss companies like Syngenta, was narrowly rejected.   Panel Discussions in the webinar In the opening session of the webinar, Sri Dewanand Pawar, convenor of MAPPP, highlighted the sufferings of the farming community who were poisoned by the pesticide Polo in Yavatmal in 2017. Farmers and farm labour suffered a lot, due to the harmful impact of pesticides, even as the District hospital was overwhelmed by the sudden influx, impacting treatment. In the following presentation, Mr. Dileep Kumar of PAN India shared details and evidences of harm caused by the pesticide polo from the agrochemical giant Syngenta in Yavatmal based on pesticide poisoning assessment that PAN India conducted in the region. During 2018 and 2019 PAN India team reached out to many of the victims of pesticide poisoning and gathered details such as medical records and police records, container of the pesticides and purchase bills. Citing the police record, Dileep noted that ‘the exclusively accessed police record through the provisions of Right to Information Act itself showed 94 incidents of polo poisonings’.  He added that ‘PAN India’s assessment revealed conclusive evidences of polo usage and consequent poisoning among 54 victims including two deaths’.  He also spoke about the illness and injuries suffered by the victims of poisonings.  He also mentioned the importance of comprehensive and strong pesticide legislation and monitoring so as to eliminate the harms caused by toxic pesticides. Christian Schliemann (Senior Legal Advisor, from the ECCHR) discussed the quest for justice and accountability in Switzerland with regard to the poisoning happened in Yavatmal India. He stressed the need of making multinational companies accountable when their products contribute to harm and human rights. He also spoke about the so-called product liability law, which in a nutshell that makes the manufacturer of a product responsible for the harm that users suffer due to defects in the product. He mentioned that a complaint was filed in Swiss National Contact Point of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation Development against Syngenta for violating the OECD guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. He added that two women who lost their husbands due to pesticides poisonings and one farmer who suffered severe health consequences after spraying Polo have filed a lawsuit in civil court in Switzerland demanding compensation for the harm suffered. In the following session, Ms Anina Dalbert (legal advisor of Public Eye) highlighted the need for an export ban of hazardous pesticides and mandatory human rights due diligence to be followed by the multinational companies such as Syngenta. An export ban for pesticides banned in Switzerland has entered into force at the beginning of this year. Anina stated that they “will keep working towards mandatory human rights due diligence in Switzerland to prevent such human rights violations as well as to hold Swiss based multinationals accountable” Dr. Narasimha Reddy of PAN India (Honorary director of PAN India, & Policy Expert) spoke about the regulatory lacunae in India. Because of this, agrochemical companies are able to escape from product liability and corporate accountability. He highlighted several directions for improving the pesticide regulatory regime. Pesticide management should be decentralised with powers to State governments, so that the regulatory response is quicker and practical. Concluding the session, Ms Sarojeny Rengam (Executive Director of PAN AP) who was moderating the session said “we need a justice and accountability for the farmers and agricultural workers who were poisoned by pesticides in Yavatmal produced and marketed by Syngenta."  The burden of proof should be be not on farmers who are poisoned". The panellists highlighted the need for better and comprehensive regulation of pesticides taking into account the corporate accountability and liability, so that potential poisonings and harms caused by pesticides can be prevented.   Contacts: Dr. Narasimha Reddy PAN India  nreddy.donthi20@gmail.com Dileep Kumar A. D, PAN India  dileep@pan-India.org Christian Schliemann, ECCHR  schliemann@ecchr.eu Ms Sarojeny Rengam PAN AP sarojeni.rengam@panap.net Ms Anina Dalbert, Public Eye  anina.dalbert@publiceye.ch   Recent Posts ഗ്ലൈഫോസേറ്റ് കളനാശിനികൾക്ക് നിയന്ത്രണം ഏർപ്പെടുത്തി കേന്ദ്ര സർക്കാർ, നിരോധനമാണ് വേണ്ടതെന്നു വിദഗ്ദ്ധർ India restricts use of glyphosate based herbicides over health hazards, PAN India calls for ban, not restriction Government Law College Thrissur organised a National Workshop on Adverse effects of Pesticides: Liability and Accountability New report recommends scientific scrutiny  of all pesticides in India  Yavatmal pesticides poisonings- Swiss judicial system takes victims’ complaints seriously Tags Adverse Effects Agroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Corporate Accountability Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Drone Spraying Fact Finding Mission Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides India India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide Risk MAPPP Occupational Poisoning PAN India Comments Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Pesticide Management Bill 2020 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Posioning Pesticide Regulation Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide residue Pesticides Phasing out HHPs PMB2020 Polo Regulation Restriction On use of Glyphosate order 2020 Roundup Syngenta Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Webinar Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Pesticides poisonings in India: Implications for business accountability and regulatory reform

    Pesticides poisonings in India: Implications for business accountability and regulatory reform PAN India, PAN AP, Public Eye and ECCHR | 16th June 2021 PAN Asia Pacific, together with the Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisoned Persons (MAPPP), Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India, Public Eye and the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR) invite you to a webinar that sheds light on the quest for justice of a group of Indian farmers who were poisoned by a pesticide marketed by Swiss agrochemical giant Syngenta. In this webinar, participants will learn more about this emblematic case of pesticide poisoning, the quest for justice and accountability of a group of Indian farmers and the way forward for regulating pesticides use both India and Europe. Date: Thursday 24 June 2021 Time: 11am CET/ 2.30pm India Standard Time REGISTER NOW The webinar will be held in English. Translation to Marathi will be provided simultaneously. Topics and Panellists A deadly pesticide poisoning in rural India – Dewanand Pawar (MAPPP) The involvement of a Syngenta pesticide made in Switzerland – Dileep Kumar (PAN India) The quest for justice and accountability in Switzerland – Christian Schliemann (ECCHR) The need for an export ban and mandatory human rights due diligence – Anina Dalbert (Public Eye) SIT report: what’s next? – Narasimha Reddy (PAN India) Moderation: Sarojemi Rengam (PAN AP) Background: In 2017, hundreds of small-scale farmers and farm workers were poisoned – and over 20 died – in just a few weeks whilst spraying pesticides on cotton fields in the district of Yavatmal in central India. A key product involved was the insecticide Polo, manufactured by Syngenta. The use of Polo’s active ingredient diafenthiuron is long banned in Switzerland and the European Union but Syngenta keeps selling it in countries where regulations are weaker and less strictly enforced. In 2017, Syngenta exported 75 tonnes of diafenthiuron from Switzerland to India. A Special Investigation Team (SIT) investigated the poisoning in Yavatmal, identified several policy measures and recommended to ban multiple product formulations that were responsible for most of the deaths, including diafenthiuron. Although temporary bans were adopted, today all products are again available on the Indian market. In September 2020, Public Eye, ECCHR, PAN India and MAPPP filed a “specific instance” with the Swiss national contact point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, on behalf of a group of 51 affected farmers, to demand that Syngenta provide remedy and change its sales practices in India. Hope to see you at the webinar! Recent Posts ഗ്ലൈഫോസേറ്റ് കളനാശിനികൾക്ക് നിയന്ത്രണം ഏർപ്പെടുത്തി കേന്ദ്ര സർക്കാർ, നിരോധനമാണ് വേണ്ടതെന്നു വിദഗ്ദ്ധർ India restricts use of glyphosate based herbicides over health hazards, PAN India calls for ban, not restriction Government Law College Thrissur organised a National Workshop on Adverse effects of Pesticides: Liability and Accountability New report recommends scientific scrutiny  of all pesticides in India  Yavatmal pesticides poisonings- Swiss judicial system takes victims’ complaints seriously Tags Adverse Effects Agroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Corporate Accountability Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Drone Spraying Fact Finding Mission Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides India India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide Risk MAPPP Occupational Poisoning PAN India Comments Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Pesticide Management Bill 2020 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Posioning Pesticide Regulation Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide residue Pesticides Phasing out HHPs PMB2020 Polo Regulation Restriction On use of Glyphosate order 2020 Roundup Syngenta Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Webinar Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Third Annual General Meeting of MAPPP demands compensation and rehabilitation package for victims of pesticide poisoning

    Third Annual General Meeting of MAPPP demand compensation and rehabilitation package for victims of pesticide poisoning Press Release | 31 January 2021 Sri. Navnath Kolapkar, Superintendent Agriculture Officer of Yavatmal district addressing the gathering Participants of this meeting expressed their solidarity with the victims of pesticides in Eluru (Andhra Pradesh), Burla (Odisha) and Arakkonam (Tamilnadu) and in various other places of India. Most of these victims are farmers and farm workers. On the occasion of the third annual general meeting, members of MAPPP met in Yavatmal on 31stJanuary 2021 and deliberated on pesticide related issues and challenges in the Indian agriculture. It was noted at this meeting that globally every year 358 million are being affected by pesticide poisoning, including an estimated 11,000 deaths. In India, too, pesticide poisoning is becoming a serious issue. There is a concern that the new farm laws brought by Government of India, among other aspects, intensifies pesticide usage leading to doubling of pesticide poisoning cases, said Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi, Adviser and Policy Expert. Sri. Navnath Kolapkar, Superintendent Agriculture Officer of Yavatmal district, highlighted the need of building resilience with sustainable farming practices to cope up with changing climate and enhance livelihood of farming community. He stressed various efforts taken by the agriculture department to support farming community. Participants of this meeting expressed their solidarity with the victims of pesticides in Eluru (Andhra Pradesh), Burla (Odisha) and Arakkonam (Tamilnadu) and in various other places of India. Most of these victims are farmers and farm workers. Mounting scientific evidence now shows that even low-level exposure to pesticides – way below what is generally considered safe – in the womb and early childhood poses a serious threat to children’s normal growth and health. Impact of pesticides on children can manifest as chronic ill health such as childhood cancers, autism, birth defects, asthma, learning disabilities, etc. Therefore, “it is high time that we protect our children from toxic pesticides. Government and agriculture department has to come up with clear plans to keep away toxic pesticides from agriculture. Along with this, they have to provide assistance to farming community to take up non-chemical farming practices based on agro ecological principle” said, Sri. Dewanand Pawar, Convener of MAPPP. Over the past two years, MAPPP has been engaged in various activities involving different communities such as farmers, workers, students, medical professionals, and lawyers. Primary focus of these activities was to increase awareness on toxicity of pesticides and its impact on community. Further, MAPPP was also instrumental in identifying the victims of 2017 pesticides poisoning incidents who are severely impacted and suffering with continued health issues. MAPPP was part of the effort that resulted in filing a complaint at the Swiss National Contact Point of the Organisation for Economic and Cooperation and Development  (OECD), against Syngenta (a MNC), whose product Polo has been named when several poisoning incidents and death of farmers were reported. This complaint demands that the company refrain from selling its hazardous pesticides to small-scale farmers in India that require Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and for which no antidote is available in case of poisoning. In addition, the company should pay compensation to the 51 victim families for treatment costs and loss of income. Further, MAPPP facilitated three victims of pesticide poisoning to file case in a Swiss Court demanding compensation. This is biggest milestone for MAPPP, because for the first time Indian farming community reached an international platform demanding compensation for the harms caused by a multinational agrochemical company. MAPPP is continuing its effort to secure justice to farming community in Yavatmal. MAPPP is committed to its work to spread awareness on impacts of pesticide on community, especially on children. Pesticides are severely toxic to children than adults. Widespread use of toxic pesticides in agriculture exposes millions of children to harmful effects. Further, MAPPP: Appreciates National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) for maintaining data on pesticide poisonings in India. Further, this meeting wanted NCRB to segregate this poisoning data as per agrochemical involved. Calls upon medical community in India to integrate challenges arising out of inhalational, accidental and chronic pesticide poisoning in their knowledge and practice. Calls upon Maharashtra government in particular and other governments in general to compensate and institute full rehabilitation package for victims of pesticide poisoning liberally and with empathy. Urges government of India to bring a farmer-friendly Pesticide Management Bill on an immediate basis, by including liability, price and quality regulation aspects. Welcomes draft Gazette notification issued in May 2020 to ban 27 pesticides and demands final notification of this draft immediately. Opposes the demand of the pesticide industry to reduce GST on pesticide products, as long as price regulation is not made part of pesticide laws.   Recent Posts ഗ്ലൈഫോസേറ്റ് കളനാശിനികൾക്ക് നിയന്ത്രണം ഏർപ്പെടുത്തി കേന്ദ്ര സർക്കാർ, നിരോധനമാണ് വേണ്ടതെന്നു വിദഗ്ദ്ധർ India restricts use of glyphosate based herbicides over health hazards, PAN India calls for ban, not restriction Government Law College Thrissur organised a National Workshop on Adverse effects of Pesticides: Liability and Accountability New report recommends scientific scrutiny  of all pesticides in India  Yavatmal pesticides poisonings- Swiss judicial system takes victims’ complaints seriously Tags Adverse Effects Agroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Corporate Accountability Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Drone Spraying Fact Finding Mission Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides India India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide Risk MAPPP Occupational Poisoning PAN India Comments Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Pesticide Management Bill 2020 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Posioning Pesticide Regulation Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide residue Pesticides Phasing out HHPs PMB2020 Polo Regulation Restriction On use of Glyphosate order 2020 Roundup Syngenta Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Webinar Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Global Outrage at FAO Plans to Partner with Pesticide Industry

    Global Outrage at FAO Plans to Partner with Pesticide Industry PAN India team Says No to the FAO-CropLife #ToxicAlliance! Hundreds of civil society and Indigenous Peoples organizations call on the UN agency to renounce planned alliance with CropLife International On 19th November,  350 organizations in 63 countries representing hundreds of thousands of farmers, fisherfolk, agricultural workers and other communities, as well as human rights, faith-based, environmental and economic justice institutions, delivered a letter to United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Director-General Qu Dongyu urging him to stop recently-announced plans to deepen collaboration with CropLife International by entering into a formal partnership. CropLife is a global trade association representing the interests of companies that produce and promote pesticides, including highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs). According to the letter, HHPs “are responsible for a wide range of devastating health harms to farmers, agricultural workers and rural families around the world,” and these chemicals have “decimated pollinator populations and are wreaking havoc on biodiversity and fragile ecosystems” as well. “This proposed alliance is deeply inappropriate and directly undermines FAO’s goals of supporting food systems that are healthy, resilient and productive while safeguarding the sustainability of the environment,” says Sarojeni Rengam, Director of Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia Pacific. “CropLife’s purpose, on the other hand, is to advocate for continued use of the pesticides that its members sell. These hazardous and antiquated chemical solutions pose deadly obstacles to the urgently needed transition to innovative, knowledge-intensive ecological approaches to farming.” The letter highlights a recent analysis of industry records that documents that CropLife member companies BASF, Bayer Crop Science, Corteva Agriscience, FMC and Syngenta make more than one-third of their sales income from highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) — the pesticides that are most harmful to human health and the environment. The proportion of HHP sales is even higher in developing countries, the letter says, where safety regulations are often less robust and harms to human health and the environment are greater. “So many of our Yaqui children have died and suffered lifelong disabilities from exposure to toxic pesticides that were banned by the countries that exported them to be used in our territories,” said Mariano Ochoa Millan, former Board member for the International Indian Treaty Council from Rio Yaqui Sonora, Mexico. Millan, who passed away from COVID-19 on August 31, made this statement in response to the July 9, 2020 statement by the UN Special Rapporteur on Toxics calling on wealthy nations to halt the practice of exporting banned pesticides. Many of CropLife’s member companies are strong proponents of this practice. Today’s letter was co-sponsored by a broad-based group of global networks and international organizations: Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA), Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), FIAN International, Friends of the Earth International, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), International Indian Treaty Council (IITC), International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers' Associations (IUF), Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International, Public Eye and Third World Network. Marcia Ishii, senior scientist at PAN North America, explained the serious implications of the proposed collaboration: “FAO’s decision to initiate a formal partnership with CropLife is bad news for the millions of farmers whose health and livelihoods have been devastated by the highly hazardous pesticides manufactured by CropLife member companies. Unfortunately, since Mr. Qu’s arrival at FAO, the institution appears to be opening up to deeper collaboration with pesticide companies, which are likely to exploit such a relationship for bluewashing,influencing policy development, and enhancing access to global markets.It is no surprise that FAO’s recently appointed Deputy Director General, Beth Bechdol, comes to FAO with a history of close financial ties to Corteva (formerly Dow/DuPont), a Croplife member headquartered in Bechdol’s home state of Indiana, USA.” "We need a strong FAO, independent of the pesticide industry and free from the market interests of global corporations, committed to safe, healthy food and sustainable farming systems for the benefit of all people,” says Susan Haffmans from PAN Germany. “With its commitment to agroecology, FAO has embarked on this sustainable path. The FAO should not jeopardize its successes in agroecology nor its integrity by cooperating with precisely that branch of industry which is responsible for the production of highly hazardous pesticides and whose products contribute to poisoning people and their environment worldwide." An international group of 286 scientists and researchers have also expressed concern about the proposed alliance, delivering a letter to Director-General Qu Dongyu today, urging him not to pursue a formalization of FAO’s collaboration with CropLife. Recent Posts ഗ്ലൈഫോസേറ്റ് കളനാശിനികൾക്ക് നിയന്ത്രണം ഏർപ്പെടുത്തി കേന്ദ്ര സർക്കാർ, നിരോധനമാണ് വേണ്ടതെന്നു വിദഗ്ദ്ധർ India restricts use of glyphosate based herbicides over health hazards, PAN India calls for ban, not restriction Government Law College Thrissur organised a National Workshop on Adverse effects of Pesticides: Liability and Accountability New report recommends scientific scrutiny  of all pesticides in India  Yavatmal pesticides poisonings- Swiss judicial system takes victims’ complaints seriously Tags Adverse Effects Agroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Corporate Accountability Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Drone Spraying Fact Finding Mission Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides India India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide Risk MAPPP Occupational Poisoning PAN India Comments Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Pesticide Management Bill 2020 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Posioning Pesticide Regulation Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide residue Pesticides Phasing out HHPs PMB2020 Polo Regulation Restriction On use of Glyphosate order 2020 Roundup Syngenta Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Webinar Yavatmal poisoning


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  • PAN India’s Comments/Suggestions on the Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020

    PAN India's Comments/Suggestions on the Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 6th August 2020 In a gazette notification issued on 14thof May 2020, the Ministry of Agriculture proposed a draft order intended to ban the 27 pesticides and sought comments or suggestions from stakeholders. Recognising that the proposal of banning 27 pesticides is a responsible, welcoming development and timely decision from the Ministry of Agriculture for protecting public health and environmental well being in India, PAN India strongly recommends the Agriculture Ministry to ban all these 27 pesticides without delay. Further PAN India urges the Agriculture Ministry to review all the remaining pesticides registered in India with the same criteria used for assessing the 27 chemicals and come up with stringent regulatory measures, including a possible ban of more hazardous pesticides. Download the Submission here Some of the pesticides proposed for ban are implicated in both occupational and self-poisonings in India. Monocrotophos, quinalphos, chlorpyriphos, acephate and malathion were reported as pesticides responsible for poisoning deaths in India. Therefore banning them is expected to bring down poisoning incidences and ensuring a safe working environment in the country. Further PAN India proposed that, non chemical farming practices needs much more support from the government and farmers needs to be handhold for taking up and extending such farming methods. Support in terms of subsidies, incentives and marketing assistance etc. needs to be enhanced for encouraging farming communities to move forward with non-chemical farming methods focussing on agroecological principles and thus to have fair access in the international market.  Additionally, PAN India recommends the ministry of Agriculture Cooperation and Farmers Welfare to put in efforts and facilitate encouraging the manufacturers of these toxic pesticides to come up with non toxic pest control products that help boost sustainable, non-chemical farming methods. Download the Submission here Recent Posts ഗ്ലൈഫോസേറ്റ് കളനാശിനികൾക്ക് നിയന്ത്രണം ഏർപ്പെടുത്തി കേന്ദ്ര സർക്കാർ, നിരോധനമാണ് വേണ്ടതെന്നു വിദഗ്ദ്ധർ India restricts use of glyphosate based herbicides over health hazards, PAN India calls for ban, not restriction Government Law College Thrissur organised a National Workshop on Adverse effects of Pesticides: Liability and Accountability New report recommends scientific scrutiny  of all pesticides in India  Yavatmal pesticides poisonings- Swiss judicial system takes victims’ complaints seriously Tags Adverse Effects Agroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Corporate Accountability Draft Banning of Insecticides Order 2020 Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Drone Spraying Fact Finding Mission Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides India India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide Risk MAPPP Occupational Poisoning PAN India Comments Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Pesticide Management Bill 2020 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Posioning Pesticide Regulation Pesticide Regulation India Pesticide residue Pesticides Phasing out HHPs PMB2020 Polo Regulation Restriction On use of Glyphosate order 2020 Roundup Syngenta Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Webinar Yavatmal poisoning


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  • PAN India urge Indian Agriculture Ministry to ban glyphosate

    PAN India urge Indian Agriculture Ministry to ban glyphosate 4th October 2020 In its comments submitted on the draft 'Restriction on use of Glyphosate Order, 2020', PAN India urged the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India to ban glyphosate (import, production, sales and use) in India, considering its health and environmental effects as well as wide spread illegal use.     Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India submitted its comments on the Draft 'Restriction on use of Glyphosate Order, 2020', demanding complete ban of glyphosate in India. Find below the comments submitted to Ministry of Agriculture. Download the submission here   Joint Secretary (Plant Protection), Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi-110 001.     Sub.: Comment/Suggestions on the Draft Restriction on use of Glyphosate Order, 2020.     Ref. : Gazette Notification, No. 1998, dated 7thJuly 2020; Notification No. S.O. 2268(E), Draft Restriction on use of Glyphosate Order, 2020 dated 6thJuly, 2020.   PAN India would like to bring to your notice that glyphosate in its approved use itself is a restricted weedicide in India, that it is approved for weed control only in tea plantations and non crop area accompanying the tea plantation. This fact has been re iterated in anorder issued by the Agriculture Department of West Bengal in 2019 quoting the Secretary of Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, states that glyphosate formulations are ‘registered to be used in Tea Plantation Crop and non plantation area accompanying the Tea crop and any use beyond this is illegal and in violation of the insecticides Act, 1968 and Rules, 1971’. Therefore, all other uses of glyphosate-based herbicides in India are illegal. An Indian Council of Agricultural Research’s report[1] reveals that two formulations of glyphosate, 41% SL and 71% SG are widely used in at least 22 Indian states for several food crops (cereals, pulses, vegetables, fruits, and spices) and non-food crops, which are not the uses approved by the Central Insecticides Board and Registration Committee. Glyphosate by itself is still toxic, causing a wider range of effects on humans and the environment.Because of the inert ingredients, exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide entails exposure to a wide range of other chemicals as well as the glyphosate, about which little information is available and the full health effects of which have not been established. Glyphosate formulations may contain a number of so-called ‘inert’ ingredients, most of which are not publicly known. It has been reported that many of the inert ingredients and contaminants in glyphosate results in increased toxicity to non-target organisms. The Safety and Hazards data provided in the PubChem database based on Globally Harmonised System Hazard Statements state that glyphosate causes serious eye damage (danger: serious eye damage/eye irritation), may cause respiratory irritation (warning: specific target organ toxicity, single exposure; respiratory tract irritation), may cause drowsiness or dizziness (warning: specific target organ toxicity, single exposure; narcotic effects), very toxic to aquatic life (warning: hazardous to the aquatic environment, acute hazard), and very toxic to aquatic life with long-lasting effects (warning: hazardous to the aquatic environment, long-term hazard) According to the International Chemical Safety Card, glyphosate exposure can cause cough, redness in skin, redness and pain in eyes, burning sensation in throat, and chest. A PAN International monograph on glyphosate shows numerous research studies pointing to chronic toxic effects of glyphosate other than cancer, such as reproductive and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. Signs and symptoms of exposure include irritation, swelling, tingling, itching or burning of the skin, photo-contact dermatitis, recurrent eczema, blisters, rashes; numbness in the face, swelling of the eye and lid, face, and joints; conjunctivitis, painful eyes, corneal injury, burning eyes, blurred vision, weeping eyes; oral and nasal discomfort, unpleasant taste, tingling and irritation of throat, sore throat; difficulty breathing, cough, coughing of blood, inflammation of lungs; nausea, vomiting, headache, fever, diarrhoea, weakness; rapid heartbeat, palpitations, raised blood pressure, dizziness, chest pains. Numerous occupational exposures and self poisoning with death have been reported for glyphosate. The topic of association between glyphosate and cancer became subject-burning discussion globally after the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified it as probably carcinogenic to humans in 2015. Though the EU’s comprehensive scientific assessment presents a different view and says ‘glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic hazard to humans’, the European Commission brought in restrictions for its use in 2016. While there are diverse views on the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate from various global regulatory and health institutions, a 2019 report titled ‘Toxicological Profile for Glyphosate’ from the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services is in view of supporting the findings of IARC that there are links between glyphosate and cancer. TheASTDR, 2019 report also shows that gastrointestinal effect, developmental effects, endocrine/hormonal effects, body eight effects, renal effects, hepatic effects, haematological effects, and reproductive effects are the various toxicity effects of glyphosate identified in animal studies. According to the World Health Organisation classification of pesticides based on acute toxicity, glyphosate belongs to Class-III Slightly Hazardous category. However, according to Pesticide Action Network International’s list of Highly Hazardous Pesticides, glyphosate is a highly hazardous pesticide, considering it health and environmental effects. Glyphosate is a wide spread environmental pollutant in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.  It pollutes water and soil and results in degraded soil quality. Glyphosate is toxic to soil microorganisms. Decreased earthworm and microbial population, as well as reduced soil dehydrogenase activity, are reported in scientific literature. PAN international fact sheet also reported weed resistance to glyphosate was reported in 35 species of weeds from 27 countries. Glyphosate has been banned or severely restricted in more than 35 countries,  of them are Srilanka, Netherlands, France, Colombia, Canada, Israel, and Argentina. Allowing continued use of  glyphosate in India would contribute to wide spread use of illegal herbicide tolerant crops, which would endanger the agroecological nature of Indian farms. As illegal HT cotton has invaded many of the cottonseed markets and supply chains in India, farmers themselves may not be able to identify HT and non-HT varieties, and therefore, application of glyphosate on non-HT cotton leading to crop destruction could be a disaster. As glyphosate is not approved for cotton in India and considering its huge use and anticipating public health and environmental issues, some states such as Maharashtra, Telangana, Punjab, and Andhra Pradesh tried to temporarily restrict its usage but ended up with little effectiveness. The State of Kerala brought stringent restrictions and/or cancellation of licenses for glyphosate bases herbicides in their jurisdiction considering indiscriminate use as well as health and environmental concerns. The regulation allowing use of glyphosate through Pest Control Operators as put for the by the Draft Restriction on use of Glyphosate Order, 2020, would be disastrous as the presence of such pest control operators is almost non existent in agriculture sector in India. Moreover, as any such regulations would actually contribute to black marketing and illegal trade of glyphosate-based herbicides in India, which will in turn endanger health and environmental well being for Indian citizens as well as India’s rich biodiversity. Hence, PAN India urge the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare to completely ban glyphosate (import, production, sales and use) in India, considering its health and environmental effects and wide spread illegal use. Further, we urge the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare to initiate legal/prosecution actions against the responsible institution, agencies and industry for illegally recommending glyphosate for weed control in crops/farm violating the national approved use. Additionally, PAN India recommends the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare to put in efforts and facilitate encouraging the manufacturers of glyphosate based weedicides to come up with non toxic weed management products that help boost sustainable, non-chemical farming methods. End Note: [1]Choudhury PP, Singh R, Ghosh D and Sharma AR. 2016. Herbicide Use in Indian Agriculture. ICAR - Directorate of Weed Research, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, 110 p. Download the submission here New study finds that glyphosate based herbicdes are used illegally in several of food and non food crops across India. 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