• Yavatmal poisonings: Syngenta’s pesticide far more heavily involved

    Yavatmal Poisonings: Syngenta’s Pesticide Far More Heavily Involved PRESS RELEASE | PAN India, PAN AP, Public Eye and ECCHR | 18th September 2020 Photo: Dileep Kumar, PAN India The incidents of occupational pesticide poisoning in 2017 by Syngenta’s “Polo” in the Indian region of Yavatmal took place on a far larger scale than previously thought. This is shown by exclusively accessed documents, yet the Basel-based agro-chemical firm still sells its highly toxic product in India. As a result, 51 affected families filed a specific instant at the Swiss OECD National Contact Point, and three victims filed lawsuit against the agrochemical corporation Syngenta in a civil court in Basal, Switzerland on 17th September. In autumn 2017, hundreds of cotton farmers were severely poisoned by pesticides in the region of Yavatmal in central India. Reports by PAN India and Public Eye documented the context and the consequences. Syngenta categorically denied any responsibility for the health and financial consequences of the events, claiming that there is “absolutely no evidence” that Polo* was at all involved in the cases of poisoning. The world’s largest producer of pesticides even officially objected, completely in vain, to a documentary from Yavatmal produced and broadcasted by the Swiss National TV. Official documents obtained by our partner organisations now demonstrate the significant role played by Polo in this tragedy and its ongoing ramifications. According to the documents, the police recorded 96 cases of poisoning linked to Syngenta’s pesticide, two of which led to fatalities. On the basis of these facts and further research, the local Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisoned Persons (MAPPP), together with the Pesticide Action Network India (PAN India) and Asia Pacific (PAN AP), the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR) and Public Eye documented the fate of 51 farmer families. Survivors of the poisoning report that after spraying Polo, they suffered severe symptoms. 44 of the 51 victims, most of whom were hospitalised, reported temporary blindness and 16 people were unconscious for several days. Other symptoms ranged from nausea to breathing difficulties to neurological and muscular complaints, some of which are ongoing today. As a result, people were often temporarily unable to work, which drastically reduced their already low incomes. The case is a further example of the grave human rights violations Swiss companies can cause and the extent to which firms now can choose whether – or not – to take on responsibility. The Responsible Business Initiative is a decisive step towards making firms live up to their responsibility and towards preventing such incidents. Due diligence requirements would finally force Syngenta to take the numerous risks associated with its products seriously and to guarantee that there will not be another Yavatmal. To support victims’ families, MAPPP, PAN India, PAN AP, ECCHR and Public Eye have filed a specific instance with the National Contact Point (NCP) for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises. Together, they are demanding that Syngenta refrain from selling hazardous pesticides to small-scale farmers in India that require Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and for which – like in the case of Polo – no antidote is available in case of poisoning. In addition, the company should pay compensation to the 51 victim families for treatment costs and loss of income. The police documents provide evidence of two fatalities linked to Polo. Together with the surviving relatives and a third survivor of a case of poisoning, a specialist law firm in Basel has put together a claim for compensation based on product liability, as one of the active ingredients in the pesticide (Diafenthiuron) came directly from Switzerland.  This legal step is being taken in parallel to but independently of the OECD NCP specific instance, which these parties are not involved in. The Responsible Business Initiative would ensure that in cases of human rights violations caused by foreign subsidiaries of a company, liability for compensation would also apply to the company headquarters as a matter of course if the Swiss headquarters could have prevented the violations by exercising adequate duty of care.   For more information contact: Dewanand Pawar, Convenor, MAPPP. +91 94231 31959 Dr. Narasimha Reddy, PAN India , +91 90102 05742 nreddy.donthi20@gmail.com Oliver Classen, Media Director Public Eye, +41 44 277 79 06 oliver.classen@publiceye.ch Anabel Bermejo, Media Director ECCHR, +49 30 698 197 97, presse@ecchr.eu * Polo is an insecticide with the active ingredient ‘Diafenthiuron’ which was taken off the market in Switzerland in 2009. It is on the list of chemicals subject to PIC, which means that the ingredient was banned to protect the environment or human health. The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has classed Diafenthiuron as “poisonous when inhaled” and stated that it “may cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure”. Recent Posts Pesticide Watch NGO releases report ‘State of Glyphosate Use in India’ State of Glyphosate Use in India Webinar on Elimination of the Uncultivated Greens: Glyphosate Usage in India PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया

    भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया प्रेस नोट  | 27 जून 2020 फोटोः दिलीप कुमार, पान इंडिया पेस्टिसाइड एक्शन नेटवर्क (PAN) एशिया पैसिफिक और पैन इंडिया ने भारत सरकार से 27 जहरीले कीटनाशकों पर कुल प्रतिबंध की अपनी प्रारंभिक सिफारिश के माध्यम से जोर देने और लोगों के स्वास्थ्य और रासायनिक उद्योग लाभ पर पर्यावरण को प्राथमिकता देने का आग्रह किया है। दो वकालत समूहों ने भारतीय कृषि और किसान कल्याण मंत्रालय के बाद यह संयुक्त बयान जारी किया, उद्योग समूहों को जवाब देते हुए, 27 कीटनाशकों पर कुल प्रतिबंध के लिए 18 मई के मसौदा आदेश में संशोधन किया। 10 जून के संशोधित आदेश में, सरकार अब निर्यात उद्देश्यों के लिए इन कीटनाशकों के निर्माण की अनुमति देगी। इसने एक समाचार रिपोर्ट में एक अधिकारी के हवाले से यह भी कहा कि हितधारकों द्वारा टिप्पणियों के लिए अवधि को 45 से 90 दिनों तक बढ़ा दिया गया है, जिसमें कहा गया है कि सरकार प्रतिबंध की समीक्षा कर सकती है "यदि उद्योग दस्तावेजों को साबित करता है कि ये रसायन पर्यावरण के लिए सुरक्षित हैं।" “हम इन 27 कीटनाशकों पर प्रतिबंध लगाने के लिए इस बहुप्रतीक्षित निर्णायक कदम उठाने के लिए भारत सरकार की सराहना करते हैं, जिनमें से कई अन्य देशों में पहले से ही प्रतिबंधित हैं। हालांकि, हाल के घटनाक्रम बताते हैं कि प्रतिबंध रासायनिक उद्योग के लाभ के अलावा किसी अन्य कारण के साथ पूरी तरह से वापस लेने या खराब होने की प्रक्रिया में है। यदि ऐसा करने की अनुमति दी जाती है, तो यह अपने स्वयं के विशेषज्ञ पैनल द्वारा स्वतंत्र अध्ययन के कई वर्षों को बर्बाद कर देगा और सुरक्षित विकल्पों को बढ़ावा देने के लिए चल रहे प्रयासों को पटरी से उतार देगा - ऐसा कुछ जो वास्तव में वर्तमान स्वास्थ्य संकट को देखते हुए एक प्राथमिकता होनी चाहिए, ”सरोजनी रेंगम, पान आप कार्यकारी निदेशक । रेंगम ने जोर देकर कहा कि इन कीटनाशकों के निर्माण और निर्यात की अनुमति कीटनाशकों के व्यापार में "दोहरे मानकों" को मजबूत करती है, जिसमें देशों को उन कीटनाशकों का निर्यात करने की अनुमति दी जाती है जो पहले से ही अपने घर के देशों में प्रतिबंधित हैं। “विकसित देशों को कीटनाशकों के निर्माण और निर्यात की अनुमति दी गई है, जो कि पहले से ही प्रतिबंधित हैं, एक अन्यायपूर्ण दोहरे मानक का खुलासा करते हैं जो जहर के चक्र को बनाए रखता है। यह एक गंदी प्रथा है कि भारत, वैश्विक समुदाय के एक जिम्मेदार सदस्य के रूप में, वैश्विक पर्यावरणीय स्वास्थ्य और कल्याण को ध्यान में रखते हुए, प्रतिकृति नहीं होना चाहिए। समूह ने कहा कि भारतीय कीटनाशक निर्यात बांग्लादेश और श्रीलंका जैसे देशों में जाते हैं, जहां पैनएपी ने कीटनाशक विषाक्तता के उच्च मामलों पर भी निगरानी रखी है। 27 कीटनाशकों में से 22 पैन इंटरनेशनल की अत्यधिक खतरनाक कीटनाशकों (HHPs) की सूची का हिस्सा हैं, या कीटनाशकों के साथ उच्च तीव्र विषाक्तता, दीर्घकालिक स्वास्थ्य प्रभाव, और पारिस्थितिकी प्रणालियों के लिए खतरे हैं। मंत्रालय के प्रतिबंध आदेश में कहा गया है कि ये कीटनाशक कार्सिनोजेनिक, न्यूरोटॉक्सिक, हार्मोनल प्रणाली के लिए विघटनकारी और प्रजनन और विकासात्मक विकारों से जुड़े हैं। वे मधुमक्खियों, जलीय जीवों और पक्षियों के भी अत्यधिक जहरीले होते हैं। पैन इंडिया ने बताया कि इनमें से कुछ कीटनाशक पहले से ही राज्य स्तर के प्रतिबंधों से आच्छादित हैं। “इन दो कीटनाशकों (मोनोक्रोटोफॉस, एसेफेट) को महाराष्ट्र राज्य में पहले से ही कपास की खेती के समुदायों में विषाक्तता की उच्च घटना में फंसने के बाद प्रतिबंधित कर दिया गया है। पंजाब राज्य सरकार ने अपने हानिकारक प्रभावों के कारण 27 कीटनाशकों (2,4-D, benfuracarb, dicofol, methomyl, monocrotophos) में से पांच को नए लाइसेंस जारी नहीं किए। केरल में, इन कीटनाशकों में से कुछ (मोनोक्रोटोफॉस, कार्बोफ्यूरान, एट्राजीन) सार्वजनिक स्वास्थ्य चिंताओं के कारण 2011 से प्रतिबंधित है। पैन इंडिया के सहायक निदेशक दिलीप कुमार ने कहा, जमीन पर साक्ष्य स्पष्ट है: हमारे किसानों को अब इन कीटनाशकों का उपयोग नहीं करना चाहिए। इसके अतिरिक्त, 27 कीटनाशकों में से 6 (एट्राजीन, कार्बोफ्यूरान, क्लोरपायरीफोस, मैलाथियान, मोनोक्रोटोफॉस), पनाप की उन बीस कीटनाशकों की सूची में शामिल हैं जो बच्चों के लिए विषाक्त हैं, जिनके प्रभावों में जन्म दोष, मस्तिष्क क्षति और कम हुए IQ शामिल हैं। मोनोक्रोटोफोस, विशेष रूप से 2013 में बिहार त्रासदी के लिए जिम्मेदार है, जिसमें 23 स्कूली बच्चों की कीटनाशक द्वारा दूषित भोजन खाने के बाद मौत हो गई थी। पैन इंडिया द्वारा विश्लेषण से पता चलता है कि वर्तमान में भारत में उपयोग के लिए 282 कीटनाशक पंजीकृत हैं। “ये 27 कीटनाशक सभी पंजीकृत कीटनाशकों के 10 प्रतिशत से कम हैं। इसलिए, उन पर प्रतिबंध लगाने से खाद्य सुरक्षा और कृषि उत्पादन पर असर नहीं पड़ेगा और यहां तक ​​कि सरकार के आकलन में पाया गया कि इन सभी के लिए विकल्प उपलब्ध हैं। कई कीटनाशकों का उपयोग आमतौर पर एकल फसल कीट संयोजन के लिए भी किया जाता है, इसलिए उनमें से कुछ पर प्रतिबंध लगाने से फसल स्वास्थ्य प्रबंधन प्रभावित नहीं होगा, लेकिन निश्चित रूप से भारतीय उपभोक्ताओं के साथ-साथ समुदायों के विषाक्त बोझ को कम करने में योगदान होगा। पैन इंडिया के निदेशक जयकुमार चेलाटन ने कहा कि प्रतिबंध के लिए प्रस्तावित कई कीटनाशकों को भारत में व्यावसायिक और आत्म-विषाक्तता दोनों में फंसाया गया है। “इन कीटनाशकों पर प्रतिबंध लगाने से विषाक्तता की घटनाओं में कमी आने की संभावना है और देश में एक सुरक्षित कार्यशील वातावरण सुनिश्चित होगा। पैन इंडिया जहरीले कीटनाशकों को खत्म करने में सरकार का समर्थन करने और कृषि विज्ञान प्रथाओं के साथ इनकी जगह लेने में सहायता करने में खुश है। ” पैन इंडिया कृषि मंत्रालय से अपील करता है कि वह देश में उपयोग के लिए पंजीकृत सभी कीटनाशकों की समीक्षा करे, जो 27 कीटनाशकों के आकलन के लिए एक ही मानदंड के साथ उपयोग किए जाते हैं, और मानव स्वास्थ्य और पर्यावरण की रक्षा के लिए कड़े कदमों के साथ आते हैं। यह सरकार को प्रस्तावित कीट प्रबंधन विधेयक 2020 में संशोधन करने के लिए भी कहता है, क्योंकि वर्तमान संस्करण में कीटनाशकों के पंजीकरण, श्रमिकों की सुरक्षा और अंतिम उपयोगकर्ताओं और व्यापार और संवर्धन प्रथाओं से संबंधित कई कमियां हैं। “अंतर्राष्ट्रीय समुदाय यह देखने के लिए सतर्कता से देख रहा है कि भारत सरकार 27 कीटनाशक प्रतिबंध के साथ उद्योग के दबाव में सार्वजनिक हित या गुफा को बनाए रखेगी या नहीं। हमें उच्च उम्मीदें हैं कि यह अपने विशेषज्ञ पैनल के निष्कर्षों से खड़ा होगा और यह किसानों के स्वतंत्र, वैश्विक और वैज्ञानिक साक्ष्य और ठोस अनुभवों पर अपने अंतिम निर्णय को आधार बनाएगा, न कि रासायनिक द्वारा स्व-सेवारत और लाभ-प्रेरित बयान। उद्योग, "डॉ। नरसिम्हा रेड्डी, पैन इंडिया सलाहकार। कीटनाशक एक्शन नेटवर्क (PAN) 90 से अधिक देशों में 600 से अधिक भाग लेने वाले गैर-सरकारी संगठनों, संस्थानों और व्यक्तियों का एक नेटवर्क है, जो खतरनाक ध्वनि और सामाजिक रूप से सिर्फ विकल्पों के साथ खतरनाक कीटनाशकों के उपयोग को बदलने के लिए काम कर रहा है। पैन एशिया पैसिफिक (PANAP) पेनांग, मलेशिया में स्थित एक पैन क्षेत्रीय केंद्र है। पैन इंडिया केरल, भारत में स्थित एक राष्ट्रीय गैर-लाभकारी संगठन है। For reference: PAN Asia Pacific- Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, executive director: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net PAN India- A. D. Dileep Kumar, Ph. 09447340748; Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi, Ph. 09010205742; Jayakumar Chelaton Ph. 09447016587 Recent Posts Pesticide Watch NGO releases report ‘State of Glyphosate Use in India’ State of Glyphosate Use in India Webinar on Elimination of the Uncultivated Greens: Glyphosate Usage in India PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides

    Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Press Release | 27th June 2020 Photo: Dileep Kumar, PAN IndiaWhile appreciating the effort of Indian government to ban 27 pesticides, PAN feels that the recent developments show that the ban is in the process of being watered down, or worse, withdrawn completely with no other reason other than the profit motive of the chemical industry.  Allowing the manufacture and export of these pesticides reinforces “double standards” in pesticides trade, wherein countries are allowed to export pesticides that are already banned in their home countries. It’s a dirty practice that India, as a responsible member of the global community, must not replicate, keeping in mind global environmental health and well-being. Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia Pacific and PAN India strongly urges the Indian government to push through with its initial recommendation of a total ban on 27 toxic pesticides and prioritise people’s health and the environment over chemical industry profits. The two advocacy groups issued this joint statement after the Indian Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, responding to industry groups, amended an 18thMay draft order for a total ban on 27 pesticides. In the 10thJune revised order, government will now allow the manufacture of these pesticides for export purposes. It also extended the period for comments by stakeholders from 45 to 90 days, with an official even quoted in a news report as saying that the government may review the ban “if industry furnishes documents proving that these chemicals are safe for environment.” “We laud the Indian government for taking this much-awaited decisive step to ban these 27 pesticides, many of which are already banned in other countries. However, recent developments show that the ban is in the process of being watered down, or worse, withdrawn completely with no other reason other than the profit motive of the chemical industry. If allowed to happen, it will put to waste many years of independent study by its own expert panel and derail ongoing efforts to promote safer alternatives—something that should actually be a priority given the current health crisis,” said Sarojeni Rengam, PANAP executive director. Rengam stressed that allowing the manufacture and export of these pesticides reinforces “double standards” in pesticides trade, wherein countries are allowed to export pesticides that are already banned in their home countries. “Developed countries have been allowed to manufacture and export pesticides that they have already banned, revealing an unjust double standard that keeps the cycle of poison going. It’s a dirty practice that India, as a responsible member of the global community, must not replicate, keeping in mind global environmental health and well-being,” she said. The group noted that Indian pesticide exports go to countries like Bangladesh and Sri Lanka where PANAP have also monitored high cases of pesticide poisoning. Twenty two of the 27 pesticides are part of PAN International’s list of Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs), or pesticides with proven high acute toxicity, long-term health effects, and hazards to ecosystems. The ministry’s ban order itself states that these pesticides are carcinogenic, neurotoxic, disruptive to the hormonal system, and linked to reproductive and developmental disorders. They are also highly toxic to bees, aquatic organisms and birds. PAN India pointed out that some of these pesticides are already covered by state-level bans. “Two of these pesticides (monocrotophos, acephate) are already banned in the state of Maharashtra after being implicated in the high incidence of poisoning in cotton farming communities. The Punjab state government did not issue fresh licenses to five of the 27 pesticides (2,4-D, benfuracarb, dicofol, methomyl, monocrotophos) due to their harmful effects. In Kerala, some of these pesticides (monocrotophos, carbofuran, atrazine) have been banned since 2011 due to public health concerns. Evidence on the ground is clear: our farmers should no longer be using these pesticides,” said Dileep Kumar, PAN India assistant director. Additionally, 6 of the 27 pesticides (atrazine, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, malathion, mancozeb, monocrotophos) are on PANAP’s list of Twenty Pesticides that are Toxic to Children, whose effects include birth defects, brain damage and reduced IQs. Monocrotophos, in particular, is responsible for the Bihar tragedy in 2013, wherein 23 schoolchildren died after eating food contaminated by the pesticide. Analysis by PAN India shows that there are currently 282 pesticides registered for use in India. “These 27 pesticides forms less than 10 percent of all registered pesticides. Hence, banning them would not impact food security and agriculture production, and even the assessment of the government found that alternatives are available to all of them. Several pesticides are also usually used for a single crop pest combination, so banning some of them would not affect crop health management but would definitely contribute to reducing the toxic burden of communities as well as Indian consumers,” Kumar added. Jayakumar Chelaton, PAN India director, added that many of the pesticides proposed for ban are implicated in both occupational and self-poisonings in India. “Banning these pesticides is expected to bring down poisoning incidences and ensure a safer working farm environment in the country. PAN India is happy to support the government in eliminating toxic pesticides and assist in replacing these with agroecological farming practices.” PAN India urges the Ministry of Agriculture to review all the remaining pesticides that are registered for use in the country with the same criteria used for assessing the 27 pesticides, and come up with stringent actions for protecting human health and the environment. It also calls on the government to amend the proposed Pest Management Bill 2020, as the current version has several deficiencies concerning pesticides registration, protection of workers and end users, and business and promotion practices. “The international community is vigilantly watching to see whether the Indian government will uphold public interest or cave in to industry pressure with the 27 pesticides ban. We have high hopes that it will stand by the findings of its expert panel and that it will base its final decision on independent, global, and scientific evidence and concrete experiences of farmers, not the self-serving and profit-motivated statements by the chemical industry,” said Dr. Narasimha Reddy, PAN India consultant. The time period for commenting on the draft order has got extended to 90 days,  until mid August.  Any comments and or suggestion in respect to the said draft Order may be forwarded to the Joint Secretary (Plant Protection), Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi-110 001. Pesticide Action Network (PAN) is a network of over 600 participating non-governmental organizations, institutions and individuals in over 90 countries working to replace the use of hazardous pesticides with ecologically sound and socially just alternatives. PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP) is a PAN regional center based in Penang, Malaysia. PAN India is a national non-profit organisation based in Kerala, India. For reference: PAN Asia Pacific- Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, executive director: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net PAN India- A. D. Dileep Kumar, Ph. 09447340748; Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi, Ph. 09010205742; Jayakumar Chelaton Ph. 09447016587 Recent Posts Pesticide Watch NGO releases report ‘State of Glyphosate Use in India’ State of Glyphosate Use in India Webinar on Elimination of the Uncultivated Greens: Glyphosate Usage in India PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Agroecology Workshop held for Farming Community in Ghatanji, Yavatmal

    Press Note | PAN India | 27th March 2019 Agroecology Workshop held for Farming Community in Ghatanji, Yavatmal Agroecology is the Solution to Escape from Pesticide Menace   PAN India has been working on pesticide poisoning, for decades. A range of activities, from documenting pesticide poisoning to the realization of agro-ecology as way of life, have been undertaken. In the past three years, pesticide poisoning in Yavatmal has been highlighted through various means and methods. A peek into recent history and the indicators of ill health in rural, tribal families shows that intensive chemical farming is causing serious health problems, often touching the next generation. Still births, premature deliveries, underweight newborns, congenital deformations, holes-in-the heart of youngsters point to a series cascading effect of chemicalisation of rural atmosphere. For pursuing chemically-intensive cotton farming, farmers here are facing serious economic losses. In addition, rural distress is seen in health, food availability, accessibility and quality, with telling impacts on health of girls, women, children and others. To overcome this distress, efforts have been undertaken by individuals and few civil society organizations to pursue non-chemical farming in this district and other parts of India. In order to intensify this movement, and also to wean away farmers from the addiction of hazardous pesticide usage, a message of solidarity has to be given out. This workshop was organised to discuss the role of agro-ecology and ecological intensification in Indian agriculture, in response of economic and health impacts on farmers and their family members caused by pesticide-intensive farming. Agroecology is the science of sustainable agriculture. Agroecology does not rely on chemical insecticides or GM crops for pest control and other agrochemical inputs. Chemical-intensive agriculture focuses on killing insects and animals; in the process it has spread chemicals everywhere leading to deaths of all living species. Agroecology is about nurturing nature, and not killing. It lets every species live, and enable food production for us without harming other species. Instead it fosters beneficial biological interactions.Agroecology raises productivity at field level, reduces rural poverty, contributes to improving nutrition,and contributes to adapting to climate change. This Workshop on Agroecology focused on the application of agro-ecological principles for sustaining agriculture in Yavatmal district. Workshop participants explored the integration of uncultivated and cultivated fruits and edible plants into farming and local food systems, as well as how to promote local natural food trade. In partnership with local agricultural research stations and farmers, this Workshop on Agroecology engaged participants in discussions and methods of natural farming and tasting of naturally grown food. Speakers focused on methods to enhance ecosystem services that are beneficial to agriculture (pollination, pest control, nutrient cycling, enhancement of soil fertility, mitigation of soil erosion, etc.). These services guarantee optimal levels of production and minimise environmental impacts while improving the overall ecological resilience of agricultural production systems. Agroecology is not limited to lack of chemical usage. It is about integration of physical and biological resources of nature, including soil, water, birds, animals, trees, shrubs, grass and microbes. Non-chemical farming in India has several methods and principles. However, with climate change, agroecology has become a comprehensive solution. Agroecology embeds the principle of local species, local production and local consumption. Yavatmal, with vast areas under forests, offers a potential for application of agroecology principles and construction of a new agricultural structure. Chemical usage, especially pesticides and herbicides, is increasing in Yavatmal, every year. Parallel, pest attacks and crop losses are also increasing. Farmers are paying heavy price, of buying and using pesticides, but crop productivity and returns from markets is not increasing. They have no other option but to adopt agroecology. Dr. Narasimha Reddy, and Dileep Kumar A. D from PAN India, Sahebrao Pawar and Geeta Bandu Sunule and other members from MAPPP were present in the event. Leading organic farmer Sri. Subhash Sharma spoke about need of a paradigm shift in farming to save farmers, farm workers and our future as well as to secure food security and food safe food. Leading organic farmers in the region share their experience of non-chemical methods of farming. Recent Posts Pesticide Watch NGO releases report ‘State of Glyphosate Use in India’ State of Glyphosate Use in India Webinar on Elimination of the Uncultivated Greens: Glyphosate Usage in India PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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