• Comprehensive New Review of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Underscores Urgent Need for Global Action

    Comprehensive New Review of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Underscores Urgent Need for Global Action Press Release | 10th October 2016 In a “state of the science” review released today, PAN International presents a large body of research documenting the adverse human health and environmental impacts of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides and underscores the need for a global phase-out. Environmental and health advocates say the monograph on the world’s most widely used herbicide, commonly known by its original trade name Roundup, should serve as a wake up call for regulators, governments and users around the world. Adverse human impacts detailed in the review include acute poisoning, kidney and liver damage, imbalances in the intestinal microbiome and intestinal functioning, cancer, genotoxicity, endocrine disruption, reproductive and developmental reduction, neurological damage, and immune system dysfunction. Aggressive public relations and marketing by glyphosate’s developer, Monsanto, has resulted in the widespread perception that the chemical is ‘safe’. Registration processes continue to allow its use without raising concerns about its safety even as new data identifying adverse effects emerge. This review dispels this myth of ‘safety’ and highlights the urgent need to re-examine the authorization of products containing glyphosate. A full chemical profile is presented, along with the regulatory status of products containing glyphosate in many countries and information on viable alternatives. Glyphosate is included in PAN International’s “List of Highly Hazardous Pesticides” (1) targeted for global phaseout. The global network is calling for the herbicide to be replaced by agroecological approaches to weed management in diversified cropping systems and non-crop situations. Glyphosate is sprayed on numerous crops and plantations, including about 80% of genetically engineered, or GE crops, as well as a pre-harvest desiccant, which results in high food residues. It is also widely used in home gardens and public places including roadsides, and semi-natural and natural habitats. Due to its widespread use residues are now detected in different types of foods, drinking water, wine and beer; and even in non-food products derived from GM cotton. The extent of human exposure is confirmed by the presence of glyphosate in human urine wherever it has been tested, principally in Europe and North America; it has also been found in breast milk in the USA. The 2015 classification by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen resulted in widespread concern about its continued use, especially pre-harvest and in public places. As a result, national bans and restrictions, and voluntary action by local authorities and retailers to curb use are rising dramatically. Sri Lanka was the first country to ban it completely, although the ban has recently been relaxed to allow use in tea plantations; Italy has banned pre-harvest use, and all use in public places and those frequented by children and the elderly; France is phasing out the use of pesticides in towns and public areas; and the European Union has extended approval for glyphosate for only 18 months instead of the usual 15 years. The research and evidence detailed in the review released today provides valuable scientific evidence for all communities wanting to follow these leads. Environmental impacts detailed in the monograph are no less concerning, and include adverse effects on ecosystem functioning, pollination services, biological controls, soil fertility and crop health. Residues are widespread in the environment, including in rainwater, surface and ground waters, and the marine environment. Glyphosate can persist in some soils for up to 3 years; and there is some evidence of bioaccumulation. Resistance to glyphosate is now recorded in 35 weed species and in 27 countries, mostly caused by the repeated use of glyphosate in GE crops, no-till agriculture, and amenity use. The monograph also contains a useful section on alternative weed management and provides information on a wide variety of non-chemical approaches to weed management in various situations. Keith Tyrell, Director, PAN-UK: “This new study from PAN International’s team of scientists clearly shows that glyphosate can cause a multitude of health and environmental problems. Our regulator’s need to wake up and ban this chemical now.” Dr Meriel Watts, PAN New Zealand: “The time has come for global recognition of the widespread harm caused to people and the environment from the constant use of glyphosate. For too long regulators have ignored the mounting evidence of damage, hiding behind unpublished studies by Monsanto, which not surprisingly paint a picture of a benign chemical startlingly at odds with reality.” Fernando Bejarano, PAN Mexico (RAPAM) "The intrinsic hazards of glyphosate and their use in tolerant transgenic crops are unacceptable if we want to achieve a sustainable food system, so we need a global phase out and a shift in policies promoting instead agroecological alternatives for weed control and crop rotation in diversified crop systems." Dr. Peter Clausing, PAN Germany: “In 2017 the European Chemicals Agency has to decide whether it accepts the compelling evidence for glyphosate’s carcinogenicity and declares it a carcinogen. This would be an overdue acknowledgement of the reality.” Dr. Emily Marquez, staff scientist, PAN North America: “The glyphosate mess illustrates the problems with industrial agriculture. Farmers are again trapped on a pesticide treadmill, as widespread adoption of Monsanto’s genetically engineered “Roundup-Ready” crops resulted in glyphosate-resistant superweeds. And yet again, human health impacts of the chemical come to light after years of widespread use. It’s time to shift away from this failing cycle of chemical reliance.” Jayakumar Chelaton, PAN India “Every month we get a new story of how glyphosate is harming people in the farms and off farms in rural India. It is clearly damaging people and planet.” Sarojeni V. Rengam, PAN Asia and the Pacific “Glyphosate is a highly hazardous pesticide. There are other ecosystem based non-chemical alternatives that do not require the use of such hazardous herbicides.  We therefore urge Monsanto and other agrochemical corporations to stop the production and marketing of glyphosate in order to ensure the health of people and the environment.” Dr Angeliki Lyssimachou, PAN Europe “This remarkable compilation of scientific studies reveals that glyphosate-based pesticides -despite what their manufactures’ claim- are far from ‘safe’. Hundreds of non-industry funded studies show that these products are gradually poisoning our people, our environment and its ecosystems. Regulators must stop playing blind and take action to ban all uses of glyphosate.”    The full Monograph review can be accessed here. For more information please contact: Dr Meriel Watts, PAN New Zealand: +64-21-1807830; merielwatts@xtra.co.nz Keith Tyrell, PAN-UK: +44 (0) 7588706224: keith@pan-uk.org Paul Towers, PAN North America: 915-216-1082, paul@panna.org Dr. Peter Clausing, PAN Germany: +49 (0) 176-7801 2705, peter.clausing@pan-germany.org C. Jayakumar, PAN India jayakumar.c@gmail.com     Recent Posts PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. September 19, 2020 PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं September 19, 2020 Yavatmal poisonings: Syngenta’s pesticide far more heavily involved September 18, 2020 Webinar on ‘Why India Should #Ban27Pesticides’ July 13, 2020 भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया June 29, 2020 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Ecological Agriculture is a political activity to ensure safe food for all

    Ecological Agriculture is a political activity to ensure safe food for all Press Release| PAN India Releasing the book, “Replacing chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology” at the Kerala Agriculture university campus Vellayani, Thiruvanathapuram, Dr. T M Thomas Isaac M. L. A. (former finance Minister, Kerala) said that the book would certainly be a great encouragement to the organic farming activities happening in Kerala and would strengthen the organic farming movements. He stressed that we need to realize the long term impacts pesticides and agrochemicals, and also industrialization of the agriculture sector. Also he pointed out the impact of modern agriculture with the example of sub Saharan Africa, quoting the book, “Seeds of Famine’. The agribusiness is only looking at its profit, not concerned on the long term impact of chemicalising agriculture. The economics of modern agribusiness is aimed at generating more and more profits, not on developing sustainable agriculture and ensuring safe food. There is a vested interest on the unsustainable agriculture by the modern agribusiness and is aimed at accumulating their profit by controlling agriculture input market. Dr. Isaac pointed it is a kind of developing a thrown away culture, through advertisements and other practices, and as part of the economy these inherent rules and practices  are largely becoming into a waste economy. And because of this, organic farming is gaining importance as a political activity. Here, everybody can participate in this political activity, not only farmers, but also for those who do not even have land to cultivate. Those who do not have enough land can also do organic farming in grow bags and also do terrace farming. Each and everyone can participate in this activity by managing and recycling household biodegradable waste, making it into manure through composting and do organic farming with the same manure. In addition, organic is also important in mitigating climate change.   Thus organic farming is a political activity to ensure fresh vegetables, safe food, recycling biodegradable waste and also a resistance against the monopolisation of agriculture and agribusiness. He encouraged the students in the KAU campus to adopt a ward in Trivandrum and support the residents in doing composting and organic farming and  to develop it into a model of ultimate green solution. The book release function was jointly organized by PAN India along with Thanal and Students Union in Kerala Agriculture University  at the Vellayani Campus, Trivandrum on 7th October. This PAN International publication was originally released at the fourth session of International Conference on Chemical Management (ICCM4).   Recent Posts PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. September 19, 2020 PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं September 19, 2020 Yavatmal poisonings: Syngenta’s pesticide far more heavily involved September 18, 2020 Webinar on ‘Why India Should #Ban27Pesticides’ July 13, 2020 भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया June 29, 2020 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Book release: “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology”

    Book release: “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology” Press Release by PAN India, Thanal and KAU Students Union PAN India along with Thanal and KAU Students Union organizing an event at Kerala Aggriculture University Vellayani Campus, Trivandrum on 7th October at 1pm to release the new book on agroecology “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology”, published by Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International. The book would be released by Dr. T. M. Thomas Isaac  MLA (former financial minister, Kerala), and the first copy would be received by Mr. Ajmal, General Secretary, Students Union, Kerala Agriculture University, Vellayani, Thiruvanathapuram. This book was originally launched on 29th September at the 4th International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM4) held in Geneva during 28th September and 2nd October 2015.  The resolution acknowledges that HHPs causes severe adverse effects on human health and the environment.  The ICCM4 has recognized highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) as an "issue of concern." The conference in its resolution, supported concerted action to address HHPs and welcomed a strategy to address them that has been developed by UNEP, FAO and WHO. Significantly, the ICCM4 placed emphasis on the need to promote agroecological alternatives instead of replacing them with another chemical pesticide. FAO Director-General, José Graziano da Silva, said in Paris in February this year "The model of agricultural production that predominates today is not suitable for the new food security challenges of the 21st century. Since food production is not a sufficient condition for food security, it means that the way we are producing is no longer acceptable." "Modern agroecological approaches to food production, together with many of the ecological practices that have evolved with farmers working alongside nature through hundreds of years, are proving to be sustainable, economically advantageous and good for food security" says Dr Meriel Watts from PAN Asia Pacific and main author of the book. Successful cases of agroecological farming in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and USA, presented in the book, substantiating the long-standing claim that ecological principles applied to agriculture are effective tools in the management of pests, including weeds, and provide sustainable livelihoods to farmers and rural communities. "There is world recognition that agricultural production cannot continue its business as usual. Agroecology offers a viable strategy to increase agricultural productivity, build farmers' resilience, and protect the environment," says Sarojeni Rengam, executive director of PAN Asia Pacific. "The experiences in this book show how farmers using agroecological practices benefit from savings on agrochemical inputs and from improving their overall farm productivity. Getting better prices or market options for safer food helps farming households too" says Dr Stephanie Williamson, from PAN UK, and co-author of the book. The case studies show that agroecological farming can improve food security and strengthen food sovereignty, while providing better adaptation to climate change and reducing harmful environmental impacts. "Advancing equitable and sustainable development goals in agriculture requires grounding agrifood systems in agroecology as the central strategy," says Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist at PAN North America, and one of the contributors to the book. "By integrating state-of-the-art science with local and traditional knowledge, agroecology offers a powerful solution to today's mounting social, economic and environmental stresses of climate change, water scarcity, land degradation and rural poverty." Agroecological practices can increase farm productivity and food security, improves rural livelihoods and adaption to climate change, and reduces the environmental impacts of agriculture. The new PAN book was written to address the concerns of policy makers around the world who are faced with the need to replace the use of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) with safer and sustainable alternatives. The book presents national and international policy recommendations designed to help implement the changes necessary to support widespread adoption of agroecology. This book is also to assist governments and policy makers to initiate a collective action to reduce the human impacts of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) and come out with a clear timeline for the global phase-out of HHPs, and to replace the hazardous pesticides with the sound science of agroecology for sustaining agriculture. Download the book here     Recent Posts PR_ Marathi_यवतमाळ विषबाधा: सिंजेंटाचे कीटकनाशक जास्त प्रमाणात गुंतलेले आहे. September 19, 2020 PR Hindi यवतमाळ विषाक्तता: सिंजेंटा के कीटनाशक अधिकतम शामिल हैं September 19, 2020 Yavatmal poisonings: Syngenta’s pesticide far more heavily involved September 18, 2020 Webinar on ‘Why India Should #Ban27Pesticides’ July 13, 2020 भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया June 29, 2020 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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